Losing a job at any time is never ideal. And for you personally clearly it could present short and long-term problems.

But the question is really aimed at jobseekers who feel that it is more difficult to find a new job when not working, as there will always be question marks over why they are on the market.

Whether times are good or bad, my reply to anyone is simple. If you think it is a problem, then it is.

What do I mean by that? Put simply, in an interview situation while the interviewer will try to remain as objective as possible, they will always pick up on lots of non-verbal cues.

The person who thinks their current situation is a problem, one that they wish they were never asked a question about, gives away that impression immediately. Any answer they give is unconvincing or seems evasive.

But the reality is that, providing you have done nothing criminal or grossly negligent, most recruiters recognise that these things happen. Sometimes you find yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time. A change of manager, a change of company policy leaves you out in the cold.

So if you do not think it is a problem, and spend no time defending it or justifying your position, then it probably won’t be a problem in the interview.

If you have fallen out with your boss and agreed to part company then say so. One word of warning, never criticise a previous employer, merely say “Wrong place, wrong time. I don’t blame them, but we decided to call it a day.” Or “I am sure he (or she) had their reasons but I could not agree with the direction the company was taking. So I need to look elsewhere”

Providing it is the truth, it will ring true. And it is no big deal, it is simply a decision that you have made.

There are a lot of people out of work. Don’t beat yourself up badly because you find yourself in that position.